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From the Virtual Desk of Dr. Hogsette

A Solicited Review of “Richard Woodhouse’s Cause Book: The Opium-Eater, the Magazine Wars, and the London Literary Scene in 1821”

  A Solicited Review of “Richard Woodhouse’s Cause Book: The Opium-Eater, the Magazine Wars, and the London Literary Scene in 1821.” By Robert Morrison.  Harvard Library Bulletin 9.3 (1998).  Romanticism on the Net 21 (February 2001). Click the open in new window button for easier reading. Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook […]

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A Solicited Review of Bacchus in Romantic England: Writers and Drink, 1780-1830

A Solicited Review of Bacchus in Romantic England: Writers and Drink, 1780-1830.  By Anya Taylor.  Studies in Romanticism 39.4 (Winter 2000): 651-55. Click the open in new window button for easier reading. Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on […]

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Coleridge’s Conversational Tapestry

  Coleridge’s Conversational Tapestry:  Revaluing the Physical Structure of Biographia Literaria by David S. Hogsette, PhD A lecture delivered at the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism ©2000 Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Biographia Literaria (1816) represents a conceptually and structurally troublesome text.  His ideology, critical theory, discursive practice, and writing process resisted and confronted […]

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Monstrous Birth and the Tyrannical Company in Ridley Scott’s Alien

  Monstrous Birth and the Tyrannical Company in Ridley Scott’s Alien: An Introduction to SF Gothic  by David S. Hogsette, PhD A solicited lecture delivered at the Faculty Lecture Series sponsored by NYiT ©1999 Bookmark on Delicious Digg this post Recommend on Facebook share via Reddit Share with Stumblers Tweet about it Subscribe to the […]

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Textuality as Gothic Prison

  Textuality as Gothic Prison:  Narrative Surveillance and Oppressive Social Codes in Caleb Williams by David S. Hogsette, PhD A lecture delivered at the International Gothic Association ©1999 [The project described by the title grew much longer than a 20-minute paper.  Today I will focus on the issue of imprisoning social codes.  We could, in […]

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Fantasy Literature and the Mythopoeic Voice of Reason (Grant)

  This is the 2010 ISRC-NYiT grant that got my current book project off and running. Fantasy Literature and the Mythopoeic Voice of Reason: Exploring the Ethics of Elfland Overview of Proposed Project I am seeking released time for the Spring 2010 and Fall 2010 semesters to begin work on a new scholarly project analyzing […]

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Textual Surveillance, Social Codes, and Sublime Voices

  Textual Surveillance, Social Codes, and Sublime Voices:  The Tyranny of Narrative in Caleb Williams and Wieland by David S. Hogsette, PhD A lecture delivered at the Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies National Conference ©1999 I. Introduction:  Transatlantic Gothic Dialog Many scholars William Godwin’s Caleb Williams (1794) and Charles Brockden Brown’s Wieland (1798) by establishing Godwin as […]

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Cultural Colonization

  Cultural Colonization in the 19th-Century Reviews of Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s Christabel by David S. Hogsette, PhD A solicited lecture for the Faculty Lecture Series at the New York Institute of Technology ©1998 I.  General Introduction My talk today comes from a book I am currently working on titled Magistrates of Xanadu:  Cultural Administration in […]

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Glowing Ardor and Cool Ferocity

Glowing Ardor and Cool Ferocity:  Political Enthusiasm and Poetic Terror in The Ancyent Marinere by David S. Hogsette, PhD Delivered at the American Conference on Romanticism ©1998 The spiritually riveting epic The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere written in 1797 was created within an historical context characterized by nationalistic uprising, revolutionary enthusiasm, political terror, and […]

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Prometheus Film Trailer

  I have always enjoyed the Alien movie franchise (well, the first two anyway…), and I remember when Alien first came out in 1979. I was a little boy, and the movie trailer terrified me. There was the sound of a heartbeat, haunting music, and fast-clipped scenes interspersed with shots of an egg. Then at […]

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